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Protect physical assets from cyber-attacks
Protect physical assets from cyber-attacks

Recent cyber-attacks have disabled and even shut down physical assets. Robust foundational security and training staff, able to recognise an attack can help mitigate the threat, as ABB’s Rob Putman explains. Edge devices and data analytics As cyber security specialists, we must navigate an ever-changing threat landscape, one that is made even more complex by the increased interconnectivity between Operational Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT), as companies look to leverage edge devices and data analytics, as well as remote connectivity, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. As the threat surface evolves, the industry must guard against attacks on key physical infrastructure, carried out by a range of malicious actors, including nation states and criminals intent on blackmail. The chemicals sector, a high-value target for cyber-criminals Cyber-criminals view the chemicals sector, as a high-value target, because of the potential cost In 2017, not long after a ransomware attack that targeted Maersk, the world’s largest shipping firm, made the news around the world. Another cyber-attack, this time targeting physical industrial assets, generated fewer headlines, and yet could have resulted in both real, as well as financial, damage. Cyber-criminals view the chemicals sector, as a high-value target, because of the potential cost, both financial and reputational, to the operator, should production be interrupted or stopped entirely. Cyber security vulnerabilities put physical assets at risk The attack in question, a ‘Triton’ custom malware attack on a petro-chemical facility in Saudi Arabia, targeted a safety system, taking over system controllers. Bugs in the code triggered an emergency shutdown, but could have led to the release of toxic and explosive gases. It was a vivid reminder of how cyber security vulnerabilities are increasingly putting companies’ key physical assets at risk. Two more-recent high-profile incidents illustrate my point. In February, a Florida water treatment plant was hacked. The malicious actor remotely accessed the system for three to five minutes, during which time they opened various functions on the screen, including one that controls the amount of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) in the water. The hacker changed the NaOH from about 100 parts per million to 11,100 parts per million, which could have resulted in a mass poisoning event. Colonial Pipeline cyber-attack incident Then, in May, the Colonial Pipeline system that originates in Houston, Texas and carries gasoline, and jet fuel, suffered a ransomware attack. Using a VPN, hackers targeted back-office IT systems, forcing Colonial to shut down IT hosts and network infrastructure, severing communication with those OT systems that are responsible for communicating ‘transactional data’ associated with fuel delivery. In this instance, a single compromised password disrupted Colonial’s ability to invoice its customers. This dependency on OT data stopped pipeline and business operations, and the company was elected to pay the hackers an initial ransom of US$ 4.4 million, in order to restore operations. The Colonial attack was multi-dimensional, in that it not only impacted Colonial’s business, but also the wider US economy and national security, since the pipeline transports nearly half of the east coast's fuel supplies. Outdated IT system elevates physical risk The increased interconnectivity between IT and OT can also create vulnerabilit Attacks such as these prove that, armed with little more than a laptop, an email account and access to the dark web, determined hackers can cause disproportionate damage to physical infrastructure. As mentioned at the outset, the increased interconnectivity between IT and OT can also create vulnerability. Producers often want to know: Is it risky to connect a production asset or their operational environment to the Cloud? My answer is, if you do so without having done any risk audits around people, processes and technology, or without enhancing and maintaining that environment, then yes, that is risky. For example, we often observe that the life cycle of a production asset far outlasts the IT systems that are used to run it. Take a cement kiln. Several generations of plant operators may have come and gone, but that asset may still run, using legacy software, such as Windows XP and why not? Need to replace aging distributed control systems Well, that’s fine, if you are not concerned about having that asset compromised, and all that entails. A ‘flat’ IT network, an aging distributed control system, and machines with legacy versions of Microsoft Windows, all these elements, which are still commonplace in many industries, make it much easier for attackers to find and infiltrate a company, without needing sophisticated tools. The age-old mantra of not interfering with a piece of equipment or software that appears to be working, often applies to the individual assets. For example that cement kiln that are still controlled by the same Windows XP-based control software. However, if we’re honest, things have changed quite a bit, not because something was broken, but because innovation came in. That same kiln control system is most likely connected to other systems, than when first commissioned and that opens it to exposure to threats that it was never designed for. The human element There is a misconception that IoT-connected devices can open companies to risk There is a misconception that IoT-connected devices can open companies to risk, but many recent, high-profile cyber-attacks have been conducted from a laptop, by hacking someone’s VPN, or are a simple phishing/malware attack. In all these cases, the human element is partly to blame. Take the Florida attack. The compromised computer at the water treatment facility was reportedly running an outdated Windows 7 operating system and staff all used the same password, in order to gain remote access via the Teamviewer app, which the hacker was then able to use. Physical and human assets, key to robust cyber security Discussion on the best way to mitigate the threat is often framed solely around specific technical solutions and ignores the fact that robust foundational cyber security is really driven by two very different, but equally important, types of capital: physical assets (e.g. production machinery), and human assets. The truth is that smart digital software and industry-renowned cyber security applications, while critical, are in many cases, only as good as the weakest human link in the chain. Industry would, therefore, do well to ask itself the following question: Do we have a security problem, or a complacency problem? At this juncture, it is important to point out that the majority of companies that ABB works with, are at least aware of the threat posed by cyber attackers, and the potential impact of an attack, on their revenues, reputation and bottom line. User error and human-generated exposures Making sure staff are aware of the threat and training them to respond properly, if they are targeted, is vital However, user error and human-generated exposures are where most of these attacks occur. Those human failures are mostly not due to malicious intent from employees, but to the lack of training of the employees on secure behavior. Making sure staff are aware of the threat and training them to respond properly, if they are targeted, is vital. However, there are also age demographics at play here. Much of the operations employee base is heading towards retirement and often, there is no plan or ability to backfill these people. Need to invest in new digital and automated technologies If you think you don't have enough people now, in order to stay on top of basic care and feeding of the OT environment, with regards to security, what is that going to be like in 20 years? For this reason, there must be a major industry reset, when it comes to its workforce. Companies must invest in new digital and automated technologies, not only to ensure that they stay ahead of the curve and mitigate risk, but also to attract the next generation of digitally literate talent. Robust cyber security is built on solid foundations When we talk about foundational cyber security, we mean fundamentals, such as patching, malware protection, high-fidelity system backups, an up-to-date anti-virus system, and other options, such as application allow-listing and asset inventory. These basic controls can help companies understand their system setup and the potential threats, identify vulnerabilities, and assess their risk exposure. The Pareto principle states that around 80% of consequences come from 20% of the causes. In the context of cyber security, that means 80% of exposure to risk comes from 20% of the lack of security. If companies do the foundational things right, they can manage out a significant amount of this risk. Importance of maintaining and upgrading security controls However, having basic security controls, such as anti-virus software in place, is just the first step on that journey. Equally important is having someone within the organisation, with the requisite skill set, or the extra labour bandwidth, to operate, maintain and update those security controls, as they evolve. Educating, training and recruiting existing employees, and the next generation of talent, along with forging partnerships with trusted technology providers, will ensure that industry can leverage the latest digital technologies, in order to drive business value, and secure physical assets against cyber-attacks.

The robotic transformation of the security industry
The robotic transformation of the security industry

The COVID-19 pandemic is only accelerating the expansion of Automation, Robotics, Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), and changing how people live their daily lives. This expansion leads the way with technologies that are developed to solve problems, improve operations, streamline processes and assist people, to focus on learning new skills, creativity, and imagination. Transformation of the physical security industry One of the latest industries to be permanently transformed is physical security. The era of utilising security cameras is slowly changing into more advanced and more efficient technological applications - security robotic solutions. SMP Robotics is a California-based company, which is a pioneer in developing robotic technologies, powered by AI, to assist, improve and deliver on new expectations in today’s world. One of their services is smart surveillance systems. This represents a proactive approach to security. The company, SMP Robotics’ Founder and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Leo Ryzhenko, stated “Autonomous robotic technologies will become a driving force in future security solutions.” Robotics and AI in autonomous security solutions The robots can patrol 24/7, counteracting intrusion and communicating via voice message with guards The company uses robotics and AI technology to implement autonomous security solutions, which reduce liability and overhead, as well as improving the quality of services. Robotic guards are capable of patrolling all types of facilities, in both urban and rural contexts. The robots can patrol 24/7, counteracting intrusion and communicating via voice message with guards. The inspection robots, deployed by SMP Robotics, are easily integrated with many existing security technologies, armed with obstacle avoidance and anti-collision measures, automatically recharge, and can recognise faces up to 50 metres. As the world grows increasingly complex, technology like this is essential to ensure safety for all. AI-enabled autonomous video monitoring ground vehicles The advancements in technological breakthroughs of SMP Robotics position the company and its AI-powered, autonomous video monitoring ground vehicles, to be the most adaptable to any industry, cost-effective for clients’ business needs, in providing various types of services from public safety, crime prevention, to asset protection and physical security. The last few years were very productive for the company. The latest generation of the autonomous models, which outperform in efficiency, dozens of security cameras, were deployed or in a process to be delivered to a number of key clients, in various industries throughout the globe, from oil & gas, nuclear power plants to data centres, healthcare facilities, and amusement parks. Smart security robots Tal Turner, the Vice President (VP) of Business Development and Partnerships, SMP Robotics, said “We provide autonomous, artificial intelligence, all-weather, all-surface, smart security robots that are turnkey and operate independently on their own, using real-time obstacle avoidance, face recognition, and other cutting-edge technological advancements.” According to Coherent Market Insights, the Robots as a Service (RaaS) market direction will grow by 15.9% by 2028 and reach the threshold of 41.3 billion dollars. SMP Robotics stands at the forefront of the security robotic revolution, making an impactful change to make the world a safer place.

The EU called for a ban on police use of facial recognition but not commercial use. Why?
The EU called for a ban on police use of facial recognition but not commercial use. Why?

Recently, the European Parliament called for a ban on police use of facial recognition. In the US, too, some cities have restricted police use of facial recognition. The first question that comes to mind is - why ban police from using technology that is allowed to private companies? Point of difference The key difference between the way police use facial recognition and the way commercial facial recognition products work is that: The police get a picture of a suspect from a crime scene and want to find out: "Who is the person in the picture?" That requires as wide a database as possible. Optimally - photos and identities of all the people in the world. Commercial facial recognition products such as those used by supermarkets, football stadiums, or casinos answer different questions: "Is the person in the picture on the employees' list? Is the person in the picture on a watch-list of known shoplifters?" To answer these questions doesn't require a broad database but rather a defined list of employees or a watch-list of specific people against whom there is an arrest warrant or a restraining order. Use of facial recognition AnyVision helps organisations leverage facial recognition ethically to identify known persons of interest "Facial Recognition Apps Should Be Provided to the Police with an Empty Database". This is exactly the subject of the open letter sent by AnyVision, to the British Biometrics and Surveillance Camera Commissioner, Prof. Fraser Sampson, titled: "Facial Recognition Apps Should Be Provided to the Police with an Empty Database". AnyVision recently raised $235M from Softbank and another leading VCs is a visual AI platform company that helps organisations across the globe leverage facial recognition ethically to identify known persons of interest, including shoplifters, felons, and security threats. Ethical use of facial recognition AnyVision CEO Avi Golan wrote, "The ethical use of facial recognition is a thorny one and requires a nuanced discussion. Part of that discussion has to explain how facial recognition works, but, just as important, the discussion must also involve how the technology is used by police departments and what checks and balances are built into their processes.” “We recommend building their watchlists from the ground up based on known felons, persons of interest, and missing persons. Some facial recognition solution providers have scrapped billions of photos and identities of people from social networks, usually without their consent." "Unfortunately, this method of facial recognition has justifiably angered privacy groups and data protection agencies around the globe and damaged the public trust in accuracy and reliability of facial recognition systems.” Preventing invasion of citizen’s privacy We believe an unjustified invasion of citizens' privacy can be prevented, false arrests can be reduced" “We believe that lists of suspects should be limited and justified. In this way, unjustified invasion of citizens' privacy can be prevented, false arrests can be reduced and public confidence in technology can be increased.” Golan added: "AnyVision is willing to share its industry insights and best practices from our vast research experience with leading global players, including name-brand retailers, global hospitality and entertainment companies, and law enforcement agencies from around the world.” Balancing public order and crime prevention “If the regulations set forth by Surveillance Camera Code of Practice are committed to the principles outlined above, then law enforcement agencies can strike the right balance between the need to maintain public order and prevent crime with the rights of every person to privacy and non-discrimination before the law." Recently Clearview AI CEO told Wired; the company has scraped 10 billion photos from the web - 3 times more than was previously known.

Latest Vicon Industries news

Vicon appoints Andronicus Turner and Jason Lloyd as new regional sales managers
Vicon appoints Andronicus Turner and Jason Lloyd as new regional sales managers

Vicon Industries, Inc., a subsidiary of Cemtrex Inc., and leading designer and manufacturer of video surveillance and access control software, hardware, and components, announced the appointment of both Andronicus Turner and Jason Lloyd as Regional Sales Managers. The appointments follow several other key additions to the Vicon team. Vicon is expanding rapidly to address escalating demand as end-users seek a reliable source of video surveillance and access control technologies fit for today’s highly dynamic environment. Work experience As Regional Sales Manager for California, Nevada, and Hawaii, Vicon was pleased to appoint Andronicus Turner. Turner has an extensive career within the industry and a demonstrated ability to nurture strong relationships with system integrators, dealers, and end-users. Before Vicon, he served as a Regional Sales Representative for Hikvision. Turner studied International Business at California State University, Northridge, and Global Management at the University of Phoenix for Business.  Vicon was also pleased to appoint Jason Lloyd as Regional Sales Manager for Chicago, Northern Illinois, and Wisconsin. Lloyd has over 20 years of experience and expertise working at the dealer and integrator levels. He also brings an extensive technical history to the position, with a degree in Electrical Engineering and roles as Senior Design Engineer and Low Voltage Director. Leadership hires Vicon enable end-users to scale their security with high-performance and extraordinarily flexible security solutions These appointments follow several other recent key leadership hires. This includes Bob Germain, an industry vet who came from Hikvision to become Vicon’s Director of Hardware Management, and Rakesh Sharma, who came from Exacq to spearhead the company’s hardware engineering efforts filling the position of Director of Hardware Engineering. Recent hires also include Leland Jacobson, who serves Vicon as Regional Sales Manager covering Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Arkansas, and Bob Kriegisch, who joined Vicon’s U.S. Sales team as Regional Sales Manager covering Delaware, New Jersey, and eastern Pennsylvania. Security solutions “We are excited to continue our expansion and welcome Andronicus Turner and Jason Lloyd to the Vicon family,” said Bret McGowan, Senior Vice President, Sales, and Marketing. “Together, they bring vast technical knowledge, passion, and dedication that will lend itself immensely to customers and the team. We look forward to expanding Vicon’s security solutions account base in these regions,” added McGowan. “The growth that Vicon has achieved is a testament to its vision, product excellence, and execution,” McGowan continued. “We are excited that each of these individuals joined the Vicon team and share our mission of driving strategy and execution, to enable end-users to scale their security with high-performance and extraordinarily flexible security solutions.”

Vicon launches NDAA-compliant Roughneck Camera Series to provide exceptional quality and performance
Vicon launches NDAA-compliant Roughneck Camera Series to provide exceptional quality and performance

Vicon Industries, Inc., a subsidiary of Cemtrex Inc., designer and manufacturer of video surveillance and access control software, hardware, and components fills the supply gap caused by NDAA compliance and the emerging FCC ban on certain Chinese surveillance cameras and components with a sophisticated portfolio of compliant solutions. Since Congress passed the 2019 National Defence Authorisation Act (NDAA) more than two years ago, many U.S. businesses have been faced with the adversity of removing and replacing numerous components of their security system. National security risks Recently, the Federal Communications Commission proposed a ban on the use of certain telecommunications products and other electronics made by Chinese companies. The order, which cites alleged national security risks, also seeks to forbid future U.S. sales and could revoke prior authorisations. Many companies in the industry kept moving forward selling banned technology" “Prior to the recent FCC ruling, many companies in the industry kept moving forward selling banned technology because it only impacted Federal opportunities. This new FCC ruling is an upheaval event bound to once again cause a major transformation in the industry impacting every space in the market” explained Bret McGowan, Senior Vice President, Sales and Marketing for Vicon. Competitive surveillance technology The ban’s enactment will create many challenges for integrators, specifiers, and end-users. The first, finding compliant and competitive surveillance technology that does not utilise any SoC (System on Chip) components from these now-banned Chinese companies. Once dealers, integrators, and specifiers identify compliant technologies, then price, quality, and time to implement them add to the complexities. As new and stricter laws began taking effect, the engineers at Vicon worked diligently to create a camera line specifically dedicated to solving the issues their government customers and prospective clients were facing. Moreover, they wanted to ensure delivering premium quality cameras at value price points. Delivering exceptional quality Vicon’s NDAA-compliant Roughneck Camera Series is designed to deliver exceptional quality To overcome this challenge, Vicon developed the Roughneck Series. Vicon’s NDAA-compliant Roughneck Camera Series is designed to deliver exceptional quality and performance at competitive pricing. Vicon recognised that to become a potential alternative to these value brands, a new pricing strategy was needed and that’s what Vicon implemented. “Vicon is pleased to have the ability to solve the challenge of compliance with our fully NDAA-compliant Roughneck Camera Series. From vandal-proof micro-domes to robust outdoor domes, these Roughneck cameras include a variety of form factors, making them an ideal solution for any market,” shared Bob Germain, Director, Hardware Product Management, Vicon. Time-consuming installations All Roughneck cameras boast a range of distinctive features, including smart IR, durable IP67/IK10 construction, and smart H.265 encoding to reduce bandwidth and storage costs. For more cutting-edge capabilities, the Pro series adds advanced AI-driven analytics, adaptive IR for clearer images in darkness, and Starlight low-light colour imaging in the 2, 5 and 8MP dome and bullets. Vicon understands the urgency in finding solutions that integrate without stressful time-consuming installations regardless of the VMS. In addition to being certified with most major VMS systems, the Roughneck Camera Series is also ONVIF certified and seamlessly transitions into any video surveillance security operation.

Vicon Industries announce the release of the advanced V1020-WIR-360 multi-sensor camera for day/night surveillance
Vicon Industries announce the release of the advanced V1020-WIR-360 multi-sensor camera for day/night surveillance

Vicon Industries’ V1020-WIR-360 multi-sensor camera is designed to provide users with the straightforward installation while delivering powerful performance and quality. This exceptional camera is comprised of four independently adjustable sensors that eliminate blind spots so that users can monitor extremely wide areas, with just a single IP address and cable. V1020-WIR-360 camera The V1020-WIR-360 camera is a great addition to Vicon’s camera line, providing the widest coverage area. This powerful camera is perfect for indoor and outdoor use such as parking lots, airports, stadiums, correctional facilities, commercial building corridors, warehouses and more. The multi-sensor is available with 5 MP sensors, creating a 20 MP model, providing exceptional image quality The multi-sensor is available with 5 MP sensors, creating a 20 MP model, providing exceptional image quality for any application. Designed for both indoor and outdoor use, this durable, reliable and flexible multi-sensor camera is IK10 rated for vandal protection and IP66 to withstand the toughest of environments. Easy installation and remote configuration These multi-sensor cameras are engineered to save installers’ time, money and frustration. Traditional non-repositionable multi-sensor cameras typically require at least two individuals for installation and tedious manual adjustments of the modules to obtain the desired FOV. The V1020-WIR-360 multi-sensor camera is designed to be effortlessly configured remotely from a PC and eliminate the need of requiring multiple people for an installation. Users are provided with the freedom to change their FOV as needed, without having to worry about manual installation changes. PTZ control and 360º coverage The camera offers presets for 270⁰ or 360⁰ views, along with which, users can also create custom views through each sensor’s independent PTZ control. Additionally, they can also save up to two user-defined presets, with each camera module independently positioned and zoomed as required, providing optimal surveillance. The 270º view is commonly used in corners, such as the corner of a building. Typical installation practice for a 270º setup is to mount on the corner of a building, allowing users to view directly in-front of them and to their left and right. The fourth sensor can then be positioned as desired to provide additional coverage such as looking straight down to eliminate blind spots. Integration with Valerus and other VMS platforms The ONVIF-compliant multi-sensor cameras integrate with most major VMS platforms and Vicon’s acclaimed Valerus A 360º is ideal for wide areas and is typically mounted to a pole and used in settings such as intersections and parking lots. This view’s FOV takes all angles, also eliminating the potential of any blind spots. The ONVIF-compliant multi-sensor cameras integrate with most major VMS platforms and Vicon’s acclaimed Valerus. When integrated with Valerus, the multi-sensor camera also supports Museum Search to streamline security investigations. Starlight technology for exceptional colour images These powerful cameras also deliver fantastic detail, day or night. With True WDR, the cameras can overcome challenging lighting conditions during the day, while 131 ft of IR illumination ensures that users can see every detail, even in the darkness of the night. The standout feature of this multi-sensor camera, when compared to the competition, is the advanced starlight imaging capabilities. Starlight illumination allows users to see vivid colours and sharp details that would otherwise go unnoticed. Operators can see critical forensic details that they would otherwise miss in traditional IR black-and-white images. PoE source The camera can be powered by 24 VAC, 24 VDC or with either IEEE 802.3at (PoE+) or IEEE 802.3bt Class 5 (PoE++) Power over Ethernet. The PoE source is automatically detected with the only performance difference being the IR distance of up to 131 ft (40 m) on PoE++ and up to 98 ft (30 m) on PoE+.

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