Paxton’s amazing designer readers and great customer service wow visitors at IFSEC 2010
Paxton’s amazing designer readers and great customer service wow visitors at IFSEC 2010

IFSEC 2010 was a great success for the Paxton team. The UK's market leading access control manufacturer showcased a range of product innovations to the delight of visitors to their stand. Trish Bambury, Brand Manager at Paxton said: "It was a great exhibition for Paxton, with both new and existing customers enthusiastic about our products and service. We are already looking forward to next year!" The real highlight of the show was Paxton's fantastic LCD reader, which wowed delegates with its sleek, modern LCD screen. The reader, that displays different images when a token is presented and access is granted or denied, was a hit with security professionals. Visitors were keen to discuss different ideas for the reader and suggest new images to upload to the LCD screen - it really got people talking. The busy Paxton stand, situated in Hall 5, offered a warm welcome to all visitors. The bright, open plan layout really stood out against competitors' stands and got an excellent response from IFSEC 2010 attendees. Paxton's professional and friendly team also received some great positive feedback on the unwavering levels of care and support they offer to installers and customers alike. Their fantastic UK technical support, free installer training and five year, no quibble product guarantee are just some of the things that keep their clients coming back time and time again. One visitor said: "As usual I was given excellent service from Paxton. The team are knowledgeable and patient and they gave me the answers that I needed."

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A hands free system from Paxton Access guarantees site security and complete usability
A hands free system from Paxton Access guarantees site security and complete usability

Hands free access control means that the token used to identify a user is read from within their pocket or handbag etc.  This means an authorised user can open a door without having to present their token.  It's particularly useful for gates/barriers, loading doors and where disabled or elderly people require access.  Compatible with Switch2 and Net2 Incredibly easy to installMinimal additional equipment (1 x hands free interface per door & hands free tokens)Retrofit capabilitiesMinimal on-site disturbanceInstalling a Paxton Access hands free system is easy due to the innovative hands free interface and associated technology.  The interface increases read ranges significantly without the hassle of installing door or ground loops as required by other systems.  Because the interface is wired in series between a reader and a control unit it doesn't require its own power supply.Hands free tokens are available in two types: hands free keyfobs and hands free keycards.  Both tokens are fitted with PROXIMITY chips that allow them to be used as close proximity tokens too.  The keycard also has a booster facility that enables automatic gates to be activated from up to 50m away.  Hands free applications:Convenience: unhindered movement is desirable in itself.Car parks: Drivers can activate automatic barriers from the comfort of their car. Regulatory: Conform to regulations as laid out in the Disability Discrimination Act.Security: Doors no longer need to be propped open in factories/warehouses where moving stock around hinders swiping tokens.Hygiene: Reduce the risk of cross contamination in food/beverage production areas, pharmaceutical companies and hospitals etc.

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Access control readers - Expert commentary

Mass security screenings with ferromagnetic detection for effective perimeter protection
Mass security screenings with ferromagnetic detection for effective perimeter protection

Live events at large venues like arenas, stadiums or convention halls – whether they involve wrestlers breaking chairs over each other’s heads, Axl and Slash letting bygones be bygones and reuniting Guns ‘n’ Roses, your favorite NFL team annihilating the opposition 62-3, or a convention involving anything from politics to food to Star Trek – are exciting affairs that channel the camaraderie of the crowd into a powerful collective energy. But they also are vulnerable to threats. Physical security solutions Terrorists and other malefactors have known for centuries that any large gathering of people has inherent vulnerabilities on which they can prey: Crowds make it hard for security to keep track of any single person or spot unusual behavior, and the number of people congregated in one space amplifies the impact of any attack. In recent years, organisers of large events have augmented the security methods they use to protect a venue, using both walk-through metal detectors and hand wands, and deploying K9 and police units to patrol the lines to enter security. But these current methods share a universal flaw: to be caught, evil-doers have to be on the verge of actually entering the venue with hundreds of other people, which means they can still cause a massive amount of destruction. In a survey conducted by Brivo, 50 percent of business security leaders felt they lack adequate budget and financial resources to invest in physical security solutions. Augmented security measures Organisers of large events have augmented the security methods they use to protect a venue, using both walk-through metal detectors and hand wands Security professionals and event organisers are constantly on the verge of finding new methods to implement in order to add an extra layer of security at venues and large facilities. For example, at this year’s Coachella Music Festival in Indio, California, which attracts over 100,000 attendees each year, organisers boosted their security initiatives by adding drones, armed guards, magnetometers and dog patrols. Unfortunately, large entertainment festivals have been a target for ill-intended individuals. Last year, the 91 Route Festival in Las Vegas, Nevada took the lives of more than 50 people and injured over 500. In the United Kingdom, 22 people lost their lives to a suicide bomber at an Arianna Grande concert in the Manchester Arena. Yet, concerts aren’t the only place new security initiatives and technology need to be implemented in, but also sports arena and large facilities. Metrasens partnered with Villa Park, the football grounds for Aston Villa Football Club in the UK, to conduct a trial using FMDS technology, Proscreen 900, to screen fans Current screening methods Conventional walk-through metal detectors are a compromise between effective screening and high throughput, as they successfully detect metal objects, but only can screen about five or six people each minute. They are generally placed 10 to 20 yards from a venue’s front façade, either just outside or just inside, to screen people as they enter the facility. Hand wands are used for anyone that sets off the walk-through detector as a secondary screening method for confirmation. Many facilities also use observational methods to screen, such as drones, CCTV, security officers or police walking the crowd and looking for suspicious behavior, or explosives-sniffing K9 units patrolling the area. Security personnel are aware of these pre-security-screening vulnerabilities around the perimeter of the venue Security method limitations Each of these methods has intrinsic limitations. Observational security methods are just that – observation-based, not detection-based. They rely much more heavily on human factors that introduce greater degrees of error and chance, and positive visual identification of a suspicious threat requires a relatively close proximity to observe the threat. They’re also slow and laborious. Walk-through detectors and wands will catch someone trying to enter a facility with a weapon, but by the time they do, it may be too late – a terrorist will already be well within proximity to do a lot of damage. Bad guys don’t need to actually enter the venue; they just need to get close enough to injure or kill a large number of people. That can happen – and has happened, such as with Manchester Arena bombing in 2017 – right at the security point, where a terrorist will be surrounded by dozens or hundreds of people and 10 to 20 yards away from the critical asset: the interior of the venue. Security personnel are aware of these pre-security-screening vulnerabilities around the perimeter of the venue. What they haven’t had until recently is a way to screen mass amounts of people for weapons of mass casualty as far away from the critical asset as they can, and as far away from densely populated areas as they can, all while not impeding throughput resulting from the requirement for patrons to divest their possessions. Expanding security reach with FMDS The far perimeter of a venue is an ideal place to screen for weapons of mass casualty. Most of the time, a terrorist is trying to get closer to the immediate perimeter of the venue, to inflict the most damage to large groups of people waiting to get in; farther away, event attendees are walking toward the entrance and thus are more dispersed, not standing in clusters or lines. This advance screening is possible using ferromagnetic detection systems (FMDS). The FMDS systems in the trial, Proscreen 900, were placed outside, where individuals were screened for large weapons before they even entered the football stadium Metrasens recently partnered with a football stadium in Birmingham, UK to conduct a trial using FMDS technology to screen fans. The trial took place in March at Villa Park, the football grounds for Aston Villa Football Club. The stadium can hold over 42,000 people. The FMDS systems in the trial, Proscreen 900, were placed outside, where individuals were screened for large weapons before they even entered the football stadium, adding an extra layer of security. FMDS is highly accurate – there is no false alarm rate, because it is programmed to find only what security personnel need to find In the most basic terms, FMDS uses passive sensors that evaluate disturbances in the earth’s magnetic field made by something magnetic moving through its detection zone. Everything else is invisible to it; it doesn’t see people, clothing, backpacks, purses, etc. Nothing can be used to shield the threat, because FMDS doesn’t detect metallic mass; it detects a magnetic signature, down to a millionth of the earth’s magnetic field. It is also highly accurate – there is no false alarm rate, because it is programmed to find only what security personnel need to find (e.g., a weapon). Although it is a passive technology, it is more effective and reliable than using observational security methods to screen a perimeter, because the technology will never miss something the way a human would. Recognising moving magnetic signatures An important point is that the system only works on moving objects. This makes it immune to environmental conflicts such as rebar that would trip up conventional metal detectors and allowing people to be screened quickly and unobtrusively without stopping to divest their possessions as they walk toward a venue – up to 50 or 60 people a minute. FMDS does not need people to be organised into lines or groups; it simply detects a magnetic signature on anything that passes. It runs on batteries – there is no need for an electricity source, as with a walk-through detector – and can be placed on just about any form factor (a pole, a stand, etc.). This gives security personnel flexibility when deploying FMDS, allowing them to create a wide perimeter around a venue without worrying about portability or a power source. Screening can be as obvious or as concealed as personnel prefer for a particular situation, based on the form factor they select. FMDS simply gives the opportunity to add a layer of security where there currently is not an effective solution All of these combine into a solution that creates a way to close a gap in mass screenings at large events, by expanding the secure perimeter and creating a highly accurate way to detect weapons of mass casualty farther away from a critical asset and large crowds. It does not replace screening for smaller items necessarily, and all large venues should use a layered security solution that also deploys tactics like roving security guards, walk-through metal detectors and hand wands. FMDS simply gives the opportunity to add a layer of security where there currently is not an effective solution. Effective mass screening solution Pessimists sometimes muse the world is getting more dangerous with each passing year, and that technology is at least partially responsible for both the breadth and depth of the increasingly creative ways bad guys harm people. But some technologies also are responsible for helping to fight against those threats and make the world safer, and FMDS is one of those. By providing a foolproof method of detecting weapons of mass casualty before terrorists get too close to an event venue, FMDS gives event security personnel a way to better protect large events, making them less dangerous and keeping people safe.

Smart access control is essential to the future of smart cities
Smart access control is essential to the future of smart cities

Throughout the UK there are many examples of smart city transformation, with key industries including transport, energy, water and waste becoming increasingly ‘smart’. A smart city is a one that uses information and communication technologies to increase operational efficiency, share information with the public and improve both the quality of government services and resident welfare. Smart access is an important step forward in providing technologically advanced security management and access solutions to support the ambitions of smart cities and their respectively smart industries. Explaining smart access If we used the standard definition of smart, it would be to use technology to monitor, control and manage access, but the technology must be adapted to both the physical and management characteristics of smart cities. Smart access is an important step forward in providing advanced security management and access solutions to support the ambitions of smart cities For example, it would not make sense to install an iris biometric sensor at an isolated water storage tank, which is out in the open and may not even have electrical power. Nor would a permissions management system work, one that does not let you update permissions simply and easily and cannot be customised. With high volumes of people entering and exiting different areas of the city, it is important to be able to trace who has been where, when and for how long. Advanced software suites can provide access to all operations performed by users, including a complete audit trail. This information is often used by business owners or managers for audits, improvements or compliance. When initiating a new access control system it is important that the supplier and customer work together to understand: Who can enter a secure area Where in the building each individual has access to When an individual can enter a secure area How an individual will gain access to a secure area This information can be crucial in the event of a security breach, enabling investigators to find out who was the last known key holder in the building and what their movements were whilst there. Installing an electronic lock does not require electrical power or batteries, much less a connection to send information Modernising locks and keys Installing an electronic lock does not require electrical power or batteries, much less a connection to send information, which means that it can be installed on any door as you would a mechanical lock without maintenance requirements. Permissions are stored within an intelligent key. If you have authorisation for that lock, it will open. If you don’t, you won’t be allowed to enter and all of the activity carried out by the key will be recorded. You can update permissions from a computer or using an app on a mobile phone at the time of access, which will update the key's permissions via Bluetooth. This allows shortened validity periods, constrains movements to be in line with company access policy and removes travel and fixed authoriser costs. This then delivers increased flexibility and higher levels of security. Remote access control utilities Access rights can be set at any time and on any day, and if required can allow access on just one specific occasion Using an app improves access control by updating access rights in real time with the Bluetooth key. It also provides notification of lost keys, joint management of access schedules, protection of isolated workers and much more. Combined with new technological solutions, an app allows contextual information to be sent, such as on-site presence, duration of an operation, authorisations and reporting of anomalies. Access rights can be set at any time and on any day, and if required can allow access on just one specific occasion, for example to repair a failure. Access can be restricted to enable entry only during working hours, for example. Permissions can be granted for the amount of time required, which means that if permission is requested to access a site using a mobile app, the company should be able to access it, for example, in the next five minutes. Once this time has passed, the permission expires and, if a key is lost or it is stolen, they will not be able to access the site. The rules for granting permissions are infinite and easily customisable, and the system is very efficient when they are applied; as a result, the system is flexible and adapted to suit company processes and infrastructures. Using an app improves access control by updating access rights in real time with the Bluetooth key Finding applications to create solutions In many cases, companies themselves find new applications for the solution, such as the need to obtain access using two different keys simultaneously to prevent a lone worker from accessing a dangerous area. The software that manages access makes it smart. It can be used from a web-based access manager or through personalised software that is integrated within a company's existing software solution, to automatically include information, such as the employee's contractual status, occupational risk prevention and the existence of work orders. In some companies, the access management system will help to further improve service levels by integrating it with the customer information system, allowing to link it for instance with alarms managers, intrusion managers or HR processes. With over one million access points currently secured worldwide, this simple and flexible solution will play a strategic role in the future of security.

Losing the one-size-fits-all mentality surrounding entrance control systems in 2018
Losing the one-size-fits-all mentality surrounding entrance control systems in 2018

The optical speed lane and turnstile sector of the security market has had a very busy 2017. Growth in commercial construction has provided more opportunity.  Innovations in technology have given speed lane manufacturers an opportunity to deliver a better product. Orion sales increase and company growth Orion Entrance Control, Inc., had a great 2017 as sales increased and our company grew. We attribute our success to the unique approach we have taken since day one: providing customised products that offer customers more than a “one-size-fits-all” solution. We offer the line of turnstiles that you would expect from any reputable manufacturer in the marketplace, but we know that when dealing with lobby security or entrance control, one size definitely does not fit all. By providing various options to supplement our core line, we give our customers a solution that best suits their needs.The ability for security technologies and their manufacturers to work together is becoming increasingly more important to our customers One area that we will continue to build upon in the development of our products is in technology integrations. The ability for security technologies and their manufacturers to work together is becoming increasingly more important to our customers. The manufacturers that can future proof their products to allow the addition of new technologies and to protect a client’s investment from obsolescence will be the big winners in 2018 and beyond. Integration in entrance control Orion ECI’s products are built with technology and designs that have this vision for the future. For example, we work with the leaders in biometrics and Point of Sale (POS) solutions to integrate these systems into our entrance control products. Oftentimes, with just a wave of the hand or the right credential, approved users can enter with no hassle or even ring up a purchase. From a business standpoint, Orion ECI experienced a year of continued process improvement and design in 2017. We reached record sales revenues as we continued to receive orders from our existing enterprise clients and new customers. For 2018, we plan to add personnel in key growth areas. This will include additional inside and outside sales positions and product production and engineering roles.