Access control readers - Expert commentary

The EU called for a ban on police use of facial recognition but not commercial use. Why?
The EU called for a ban on police use of facial recognition but not commercial use. Why?

Recently, the European Parliament called for a ban on police use of facial recognition. In the US, too, some cities have restricted police use of facial recognition. The first question that comes to mind is - why ban police from using technology that is allowed to private companies? Point of difference The key difference between the way police use facial recognition and the way commercial facial recognition products work is that: The police get a picture of a suspect from a crime scene and want to find out: "Who is the person in the picture?" That requires as wide a database as possible. Optimally - photos and identities of all the people in the world. Commercial facial recognition products such as those used by supermarkets, football stadiums, or casinos answer different questions: "Is the person in the picture on the employees' list? Is the person in the picture on a watch-list of known shoplifters?" To answer these questions doesn't require a broad database but rather a defined list of employees or a watch-list of specific people against whom there is an arrest warrant or a restraining order. Use of facial recognition AnyVision helps organisations leverage facial recognition ethically to identify known persons of interest "Facial Recognition Apps Should Be Provided to the Police with an Empty Database". This is exactly the subject of the open letter sent by AnyVision, to the British Biometrics and Surveillance Camera Commissioner, Prof. Fraser Sampson, titled: "Facial Recognition Apps Should Be Provided to the Police with an Empty Database". AnyVision recently raised $235M from Softbank and another leading VCs is a visual AI platform company that helps organisations across the globe leverage facial recognition ethically to identify known persons of interest, including shoplifters, felons, and security threats. Ethical use of facial recognition AnyVision CEO Avi Golan wrote, "The ethical use of facial recognition is a thorny one and requires a nuanced discussion. Part of that discussion has to explain how facial recognition works, but, just as important, the discussion must also involve how the technology is used by police departments and what checks and balances are built into their processes.” “We recommend building their watchlists from the ground up based on known felons, persons of interest, and missing persons. Some facial recognition solution providers have scrapped billions of photos and identities of people from social networks, usually without their consent." "Unfortunately, this method of facial recognition has justifiably angered privacy groups and data protection agencies around the globe and damaged the public trust in accuracy and reliability of facial recognition systems.” Preventing invasion of citizen’s privacy We believe an unjustified invasion of citizens' privacy can be prevented, false arrests can be reduced" “We believe that lists of suspects should be limited and justified. In this way, unjustified invasion of citizens' privacy can be prevented, false arrests can be reduced and public confidence in technology can be increased.” Golan added: "AnyVision is willing to share its industry insights and best practices from our vast research experience with leading global players, including name-brand retailers, global hospitality and entertainment companies, and law enforcement agencies from around the world.” Balancing public order and crime prevention “If the regulations set forth by Surveillance Camera Code of Practice are committed to the principles outlined above, then law enforcement agencies can strike the right balance between the need to maintain public order and prevent crime with the rights of every person to privacy and non-discrimination before the law." Recently Clearview AI CEO told Wired; the company has scraped 10 billion photos from the web - 3 times more than was previously known.

Access the right areas - Making a smart home genius with biometrics
Access the right areas - Making a smart home genius with biometrics

Household adoption of smart home systems currently sits at 12.1% and is set to grow to 21.4% by 2025, expanding the market from US$ 78.3 billion to US$ 135 billion, in the same period. Although closely linked to the growth of connectivity technologies, including 5G, tech-savvy consumers are also recognising the benefits of next-generation security systems, to protect and secure their domestic lives. Biometric technologies are already commonplace in our smartphones, PCs and payment cards, enhancing security without compromising convenience. Consequently, manufacturers and developers are taking note of biometric solutions, as a way of levelling-up their smart home solutions. Biometrics offer enhanced security As with any home, security starts at the front door and the first opportunity for biometrics to make a smart home genius lies within the smart lock. Why? Relying on inconvenient unsecure PINs and codes takes the ‘smart’ out of smart locks. As the number of connected systems in our homes increase, we cannot expect consumers to create, remember and use an ever-expanding list of unique passwords and PINs. Indeed, 60% of consumers feel they have too many to remember and the number can be as high as 85 for all personal and private accounts. Biometric solutions strengthen home access control Biometric solutions have a real opportunity to strengthen the security and convenience of home access control Doing this risks consumers becoming apathetic with security, as 41% of consumers admit to re-using the same password or introducing simple minor variations, increasing the risk of hacks and breaches from weak or stolen passwords. Furthermore, continually updating and refreshing passwords, and PINs is unappealing and inconvenient. Consequently, biometric solutions have a real opportunity to strengthen the security and convenience of home access control. Positives of on-device biometric storage Biometric authentication, such as fingerprint recognition uses personally identifiable information, which is stored securely on-device. By using on-device biometric storage, manufacturers are supporting the 38% of consumers, who are worried about privacy and biometrics, and potentially winning over the 17% of people, who don’t use smart home devices for this very reason. Compared to conventional security, such as passwords, PINs or even keys, which can be spoofed, stolen, forgotten or lost, biometrics is difficult to hack and near impossible to spoof. Consequently, homes secured with biometric smart locks are made safer in a significantly more seamless and convenient way for the user. Biometric smart locks Physical access in our domestic lives doesn’t end at the front door with smart locks. Biometrics has endless opportunities to ease our daily lives, replacing passwords and PINs in all devices. Biometric smart locks provide personalised access control to sensitive and hazardous areas, such as medicine cabinets, kitchen drawers, safes, kitchen appliances and bike locks. They offer effective security with a touch or glance. Multi-tenanted sites, such as apartment blocks and student halls, can also become smarter and more secure. With hundreds of people occupying the same building, maintaining high levels of security is the responsibility for every individual occupant. Biometric smart locks limit entry to authorised tenants and eliminate the impact of lost or stolen keys, and passcodes. Furthermore, there’s no need for costly lock replacements and when people leave the building permanently, their data is easily removed from the device. Authorised building access Like biometric smart locks in general, the benefits extend beyond the front door Like biometric smart locks in general, the benefits extend beyond the front door, but also throughout the entire building, such as washing rooms, mail rooms, bike rooms and community spaces, such as gyms. Different people might have different levels of access to these areas, depending on their contracts, creating an access control headache. But, by having biometric smart locks, security teams can ensure that only authorised people have access to the right combination of rooms and areas. Convenience of biometric access cards Additionally, if building owners have options. The biometric sensors can be integrated into the doors themselves, thereby allowing users to touch the sensor, to unlock the door and enter. Furthermore, the latest technology allows biometric access cards to be used. This embeds the sensor into a contactless keycard, allowing the user to place their thumb on the sensor and tap the card to unlock the door. This may be preferable in circumstances where contactless keycards are already in use and can be upgraded. Smarter and seamless security In tandem with the growth of the smart home ecosystem, biometrics has real potential to enhance our daily lives, by delivering smarter, seamless and more convenient security. Significant innovation has made biometrics access control faster, more accurate and secure. Furthermore, today’s sensors are durable and energy efficient. With the capacity for over 10 million touches and ultra-low power consumption, smart home system developers no longer have to worry about added power demands. As consumers continue to invest in their homes and explore new ways to secure and access them, biometrics offers a golden opportunity for market players, to differentiate and make smart homes even smarter.

Open Supervised Device Protocol (OSDP) – what you need to know about modern and future proof access control security?
Open Supervised Device Protocol (OSDP) – what you need to know about modern and future proof access control security?

Access control and management of trusted identities are the building blocks of security, safety, and site management policies for many businesses and organisations. The current pandemic has compounded this with the introduction of new policies and regulations, particularly around social distancing and contact tracing. Most organisations will have some form of legacy access control in place, ranging from the most simplistic options, such as locks and keys, to technology-based systems. The issue with legacy systems of any type is that risks, just like technology, evolve. What was secure, convenient, and efficient a few years ago is often found wanting as the threat landscape changes. The standards governing the development and testing of physical access control systems (PACS) have also evolved to improve security and product interoperability. An example is the Open Supervised Device Protocol (OSDP), introduced 10 years ago as an alternative to the antiquated and vulnerable Clock-and-Data and Wiegand protocols. However, when it comes to planning infrastructure upgrades or implementing new tools, businesses must carry out due diligence to ensure the solutions are future-proof and deliver the expected level of security. Vulnerabilities and challenges In the early 1980s, Clock-and-Data and Wiegand protocols were widely adopted as the de-facto standard for interoperability between access control readers and physical access controllers. Those de-facto standards were later formalised and adopted into industry standards by the Security Industry Association in the 1990s. Wiegand is unencrypted and unable to protect from “man in the middle” attacks and vulnerabilities  There were weaknesses, though, Wiegand is unencrypted and unable to protect from “man in the middle” attacks and vulnerabilities from the reader to the controller. Not only that, but Wiegand delivers limited range options and is operationally inefficient. It is also easy to target via its learnable language and a host of hacking devices available via online sources. Furthermore, the retrofitting installation alongside a legacy system is complicated for integrators and expensive for organisations, as most readers require dedicated home-run wiring. Extensive wiring on a large-scale project, such as a school or corporate campus, results in considerable — often prohibitive — costs for the installation of a PACS. Legacy access control protocol Despite the well-publicised vulnerabilities and weaknesses, Wiegand is still one of the most common protocols in legacy access control, with estimates indicating it is used in more than 90 percent of installed systems. This not only presents issues about physical security but also raises concerns relating to the protection of personal data. Access control systems not only contain information about who can and cannot use certain doors. OSDP is a communication standard Modern systems include a wide range of personal data, ranging from qualifications and certifications of individuals, home contact details, and even medical conditions or HR and employment information. With the potential fines associated with GDPR breaches, companies need to take this concern seriously. These weaknesses pushed the security industry to adopt a new protocol: Open Supervised Device Protocol (OSDP). This access control communications standard was developed by Mercury Security (now part of HID Global) and HID Global in 2008, and donated, free of intellectual property, to the Security Industry Association (SIA) to improve interoperability among access control and security products. Since then, it has been adopted as a standard by SIA, becoming the first secure, bidirectional reader/controller protocol to be governed by a major standards body in the security industry. In 2020 OSDP reached an additional milestone in becoming an International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard. Why implement OSDP as a standard? OSDP is the only protocol that is secure and open for communication between readers and controllers The growth of networked devices, such as video and access control products, has led to an increased demand for converged solutions. Businesses and organisations recognise the value of implementing an integrated solution to enhance security and add value to technology investment. OSDP is the only protocol that is secure and open for communication between readers and controllers and is also being widely adopted by industry-leading reader and controller manufacturers. It is an evolving, ‘living standard,’ making it a safer, more robust, future-proof option for governing physical access control systems. OSDP offers important benefits: 1) Increased security Implementing OSDP standards can increase security, as OSDP with Secure Channel Protocol (SCP) supports AES-128 encryption that is required in U.S. federal government applications. Additionally, OSDP constantly monitors wiring to protect against tampering, removing the guesswork since the encryption and authentication are predefined. 2) Bidirectional communication Early on, communication protocols such as Wiegand were unidirectional, with external card readers sending information one way to a centralized access control platform. OSDP has transformed the ability for information to be collected, shared, and acted upon with the addition of bidirectional communication for configuration, status monitoring, tampering, and malfunction detection, and other valuable functions. In fact, OSDP is the only open, non-proprietary, bidirectional, secure protocol for communication between card reader and physical access controller. 3) Open and interoperable OSDP adds new technology that enhances its ability to protect incoming and outgoing data collection OSDP supports IP communications and point-to-point serial interfaces, enabling customers to flexibly enhance system functionality as needs change and new threats emerge. They also can proactively add new technology that enhances their ability to protect incoming and outgoing data collection through a physical access control system. 4) Reduced installation costs OSDP’s use of two wires (as compared to a potential of 11 wires with Wiegand) allows for multi-drop installation, supervised connections to indicate reader malfunctions, and scalability to connect more field devices. Daisy-chaining accommodates many readers connected to a single controller, eliminating the need to run home-run wiring for each reader, and the use of a four-conductor cable achieves up to 10x longer distances between reader and controller than Wiegand while also powering the reader and sending/receiving data. 5) User friendly OSDP gives credential holders greater ease of use, with audio and visual feedback such as coloured lights, audible beeps, and the ability to display alerts on the reader. For security administrators, managing and servicing OSDP-enabled readers also becomes increasingly convenient, as OSDP-enabled readers can be remotely configured from network-connected locations. Users can poll and query readers from a central location, eliminating the cost and time to physically visit and diagnose malfunctioning devices. Unlimited application enhancements OSDP streamlines installations and upgrades while saving organisations the expense of replacing readers  OSDP supports advanced smartcard technology applications, including PKI/FICAM and biometrics, and other enhanced authentication protocols used in applications that require Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) compliance and interactive terminal capabilities. Audio-visual user feedback mechanisms provide a rich, user-centric access control environment. OSDP offers advantages for users, administrators, and integrators, alike. It adds security and real-world efficiencies, and its interoperability ensures that organisations can use systems from numerous manufacturers as they invest in infrastructure that maximises the protection of critical data. For our part, HID Global’s range of HID Signo readers is OSDP verified, ensuring they offer the intended interoperability and security for secure bidirectional communication and provide an easy migration from Wiegand devices. In a campus environment, OSDP streamlines installations and upgrades while saving organisations the expense of replacing readers if a new access control solution is implemented. There are also service and maintenance benefits as OSDP encourages continuous monitoring of system uptime and allows for remote configuration of -- or upgrades to -- a reader. Cost savings upon system upgrade Integrators can also capitalise on the introduction of OSDP by encouraging open standards, which can, in turn, help them build new customer relationships and win more projects. Although upgrading to access control systems that adhere to OSDP standards is a significant initiative, the range of benefits outweighs the cost of upgrading. Increased security coupled with business efficiencies adds value for those administering the system and a high level of interoperability ensures users can deploy systems from numerous third-party manufacturers. Integrators who understand the benefits of OSDP can also help their customers support both current and future technology requirements. When a site’s needs change, OSDP offers significant cost savings as the open functionality makes adding new devices easier and reduces the expense of requiring all readers to be replaced if a new solution is installed. Businesses and organisations transitioning to OSDP will also enhance value in terms of operational costs such as servicing and maintenance.

Latest Hanwha Techwin Europe news

Hanwha Techwin launches Wisenet Road AI intelligent traffic management solution
Hanwha Techwin launches Wisenet Road AI intelligent traffic management solution

Road planners, traffic regulation enforcement authorities, and police are now able to take advantage of AI technology to identify the make, model, and colour of vehicles, as well as recognise car number plates. The Wisenet Road AI edge-based solution which runs on-board selected Wisenet P series 4K cameras uses AI video analytics to identify over 600 vehicle models manufactured across 70 brands. ANPR and MMCR technologies Wisenet Road AI combines Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) and Make, Model, Colour Recognition (MMCR) technologies to provide local authorities and law enforcement agencies with data that can be used to accurately identify vehicles involved in traffic infringements. Police can use the make, model, and colour search criteria to cross-reference against reports of stolen vehicles With eyewitness accounts quite often being inaccurate or incomplete, and particularly so about vehicle license number plates, the ability to search for vehicles by make, model, and colour is likely to be of great help to investigating teams when looking to find the video of a vehicle involved in an incident. Similarly, with criminals frequently swapping the license number plates on vehicles to avoid ANPR identifying that they are stolen, police can use the make, model, and colour search criteria to cross-reference against reports of stolen vehicles. Graphical user interface A smart search feature, which is used via the Wisenet Road AI’s intuitive graphical user interface, is supported by Wisenet WAVE, Wisenet SSM, and other VMS from leading software developers such as Genetec and Milestone. As such, operators can quickly search recorded video for vehicles that may have been stolen or involved in an accident. Key features Wisenet Road AI can recognise most UK and mainland European number plates, as well as those on Canadian, US, and Russian CIS vehicles. Alert notifications are generated when vehicles on blacklists are detected, whilst access to car parks can be restricted to whitelisted vehicles. Open API for integration. Application of Wisenet Road AI The solution’s dashboard provides an overview of key statistics such as the number and type of vehicles Wisenet Road AI can also be used to conduct surveys to gain a greater understanding of road usage, with planners being able to take any trends into account when the widening of roads or the creation of new bus and cycle lanes are being considered. In this respect, the solution’s dashboard provides an overview of key statistics such as the number and type of vehicles, e.g. cars, buses, and trucks, identified per day or week in pie charts and other display formats. Cameras used The 3 Wisenet P series cameras which support Wisenet Road AI are as follows: PNV-A9081RLP dome camera: Coverage of 2 traffic lanes when vehicles are moving at up to 45mph (70km/h) PNO-A9081RLP bullet camera: Coverage of 2 traffic lanes when vehicles are moving at up to 45mph (70km/hr) PNB-A9001LP fixed camera: Coverage of 2 traffic lanes when vehicles are moving at up to 90mph (140km/h) AI video analytics “Wisenet Road AI is an excellent example of how we are developing new, innovative solutions which deliver real-world practical benefits to users, whilst creating new business opportunities for system integrators and our business partners”, said Uri Guterman, Head of Product & Marketing for Hanwha Techwin Europe. “With highly accurate AI video analytics at the heart of this solution, system designers can rest assured their end-user clients will be able to take full advantage of the ultra-high resolution video captured by the 4K cameras”.

Hanwha Techwin announces the launch of new Wisenet P series Network Video Recorders (NVRs) with AI functionality
Hanwha Techwin announces the launch of new Wisenet P series Network Video Recorders (NVRs) with AI functionality

The 5 new Wisenet P series AI NVRs (Network Video Recorders) launched by Hanwha Techwin are able to apply AI metadata to images captured by most non-AI Wisenet cameras, allowing users to quickly and accurately search for people, and vehicles. Deep Learning AI video analytics The licence-free Deep Learning AI video analytics onboard the NDAA-compliant NVRs offer a wide range of search criteria, including, for example, looking for people of a certain age group or gender, as well as whether they are wearing glasses or carrying a bag. Similarly, a search for vehicles can be narrowed down to those of a particular colour and whether they are a bicycle, bus, car, motorbike or truck. The Network Video Recorders can also be set up to trigger real-time alarm notifications, if an object is detected. Support for wide range of cameras The new devices are able to support all the features built into the Wisenet P series AI cameras Selected bullet, fixed, PTZ, 360° fisheye, multi-directional and thermal cameras from the Wisenet X, P, Q and T series, are among the long list of cameras that are supported by the new Wisenet P series AI NVRs. In addition, as is the case with 32 and 64 channel Wisenet X NVRs, the new devices are able to support all the features built into the Wisenet P series AI cameras, including the classification and detection of faces and licence plates.   Operators can take full advantage of the Network Video Recorders’ functionality, with the help of UX 2.0, a brand-new user interface that offers zoom in/out and drag & drop support, and a timeline preview feature, as well as enabling all event settings to be edited in a single window. Wisenet P series AI NVRs Other key features shared by the Network Video Recorders (NVRs), include the following: Up to 400Mbps network camera recording, at up to 32MP recording resolution Up to 16 SATA HDD bays, each offer 10TB storage data capacity. RAID-5 and RAID-6 support Dual 4K and 1080p HDMI outputs Simultaneous playback across all channels Dynamic event support, including e-mail alerts, PTZ preset control of PTZ cameras, control room buzzer and monitor Support for Wisenet AI and 8K cameras, and improved compatibility with all Wisenet PTZ, multi-directional and thermal cameras ONVIF Profile S conformant WiseStream II complementary compression technology The NVRs feature WiseStream II complementary compression technology, which improves bandwidth efficiency by up to 75%, in comparison to current H.264 technology, when combined with H.265 compression. The ability of the NVRs to support cameras, which are dual streaming video at different resolutions, can further reduce bandwidth requirements. The Network Video Recorders’ SATA HDDs are supported by Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology (S.M.A.R.T) The Network Video Recorders’ SATA HDDs are supported by Self-Monitoring, Analysis and Reporting Technology (S.M.A.R.T), which detects and alerts operators, to any possible imminent hardware failures. Offering N+1 failover support, the NVRs also feature Automatic Recovery Back-up (ARB), to provide continuity of recording and remove the risk of video evidence being lost. Automatic Recovery Back-up (ARB) facilitates the transfer and seamless storage of the images stored on a camera’s SD card, if communication between one of the Network Video Recorders and a Wisenet camera is disrupted. In addition, the new PRN-6405DB4 NVR is equipped with a dual switched-mode power supply (SMPS), to provide continuity of recording for mission-critical applications. GDPR compliance support and easy configuration Security personnel can apply bookmarks, in order to prevent the important video from being overwritten, with the NVRs programmed to automatically delete the bookmarked video, after a defined time period, so as to ensure compliance with GDPR. The installation time of the new Network Video Recorders is minimised, by the ability of engineers to remotely connect to the NVRs. This is achieved via a smartphone or tablet, without having to set up a complex network, by using P2P and unique QR product codes. Furthermore, the NVRs can be easily configured to match an end user’s requirements, with the help of an intuitive interface and installation Wizard. The new Wisenet P AI network NVRs are as follows: PRN-1605B2: 16 channel AI NVR. Up to 8 channels providing AI support. 2 HHD bays PRN-3205B2: 32 channel AI NVR. Up to 16 channels providing AI support. 2 HHD bays PRN-3205B4: 32 channel AI NVR. Up to 16 channels providing AI support. 4 HHD bays PRN-6405B4: 64 channel AI NVR. Up to 32 channels providing AI support. 4 HHD bays PRN-6405DB4: 64 channel AI NVR. Up to 32 channels providing AI support. Dual switch mode power supply (SMPS). 4 HHD bays Powerful detection tool “The accuracy of the Deep Learning AI video analytics incorporated into these new NVRs provides security personnel with a powerful tool to detect and track people, or vehicles that may be involved in criminal activity,” said Uri Guterman, the Head of Product & Marketing for Hanwha Techwin Europe. Uri Guterman adds, “By eliminating false alarms, which can occur when standard motion detection technology or sensors are being used to detect activity, the NVRs significantly reduce time wasting and allow security personnel to focus on responding to real incidents and emergencies.”

Hanwha Techwin launches serverless Wisenet parking guidance solution
Hanwha Techwin launches serverless Wisenet parking guidance solution

The introduction of the Wisenet TNF-9010 360° Parking Guidance device could not perhaps come at a better time with city centre and office car parks once again often filling up to capacity. To maximise revenue for car park operators by optimising occupancy levels and reducing congestion and queues, the Wisenet Parking Guidance Solution is designed to help drivers quickly locate vacant car parking bays. AI-based vehicle detection With built-in AI-based vehicle detection functionality, the Wisenet Parking Guidance device only needs to utilise a single Wisenet TNF-9010 camera to monitor and analyse up to 16 parking bays to establish if they are occupied or vacant. Quick and easy to install, the device offers a highly cost-effective alternative to solutions that require multiple cameras to cover the same number of parking bays, as, in addition to lower initial capital costs, it also requires less maintenance.  The device’s built-in LEDs can be configured to display up to 7 different colours to provide real-time visual indicators on where drivers can find various categories of available parking spaces. These include those which have been allocated for the physically challenged, electric cars and parents with children, or those reserved for a company’s employees and visitors.  Keeping vehicles and people safe In addition to its parking guidance capabilities, the 12-megapixel 360° TNF-9010 can help deter and detect anti-social and criminal activity as it can be used to monitor large areas without any blind spots. The presence of the device will also enable car drivers to feel safe when they are leaving or returning to their cars. TNF-9010 can be configured to broadcast an alarm through connected speakers when integrated with alerts The 360° images captured by the TNF-9010 are enhanced at the edges with the help of a stereographic type lens, whilst onboard dewarping processing ensures that when the camera is in quad mode, there is no visible distortion of the captured images, such as straight lines of objects appearing to be curved, which normally occurs when 360° fisheye images are displayed. The TNF-9010 can be configured to broadcast an alarm through connected speakers when it is integrated with emergency alerts technology. Control room operators who receive alarms generated by the camera can easily retrieve the respective recorded video, allowing them to visually verify what may be occurring. Cyber secure Wisenet7 chipset The TNF-9010 camera is equipped with Wisenet7, Hanwha Techwin’s most powerful chipset to date. In addition to enabling it to capture clear, sharp images in all lighting conditions with the help of advanced noise reduction and WDR technology, Wisenet7’s industry pioneering cyber security functionality also ensures the camera’s firmware is protected from hackers and that drivers’ confidential data is safeguarded. Other key features of the Wisenet TNF-9010 Parking Guidance camera include: Simultaneous streaming of up to five channels offers 1 overview and 4 single views. An RJ-45 port facilitates the camera’s connection to a cable raceway. 'Direct Point' enables the vehicle detection area within each of the camera channel’s field of view to be precisely defined. Digital PTZ (DPTZ) functionality allows operators to precisely set the camera’s field of view. Audio, defocus, and tampering detection. Analytics and alarm input/output (I/O). Supported by Wisenet Wave, Milestone, and Genetec video management software platforms. Cost-effective The cost-effectiveness of the solution is enhanced as users do not have to incur the cost of the application As an edge-based solution with AI-based analytics onboard, the TNF-9010 does not need to be supported by a server. The cost-effectiveness of the solution is, therefore, further enhanced as users do not have to incur the cost of installing and maintaining additional hardware to run the application. “With COVID-19 lockdown restrictions eased, car parks will once again need to be managed to avoid queues and congestion caused by drivers trying to find a parking space”, said Uri Guterman, Head of Product & Marketing for Hanwha Techwin Europe. “In this respect, we are confident that the TNF-9010 will be able to help car park operators maximise revenue, with the bonus of improving the customer experience by ensuring drivers do not frustratingly waste time looking for a vacant parking bay”.

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