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Security Industry Association highlights carbon monoxide detector usage against the 'Silent Killer'

SIA is the leading trade group for businesses in the electronic and physical security market
SIA and two other groups wrote about increased carbon monoxide detector usage in a letter to key lawmakers
Increased carbon monoxide detector usage is needed to stop what has become the leading cause of accidental poisoning deaths in the United States, the Security Industry Association and two other groups wrote in a December 17 letter to key lawmakers.

Carbon monoxide (CO), a colorless, odorless gas known as the "silent killer," claims more than 400 lives in the United States each year and sends 20,000 people to the hospital.

In the letter to the chairman and ranking member of the Senate Commerce Committee's Subcommittee on Consumer Protection, Product Safety and Insurance, SIA, the National Electrical Manufacturers Association and the Electronic Security Association expressed support for the goals of S. 1216, the Residential Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Prevention Act, from Sens. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., and Bill Nelson, R-Fla. The legislation would promote the use of CO detectors, advance technical standards for such detectors, encourage states to require the installation of the detectors and establish a federal grant program to fund state-based CO detector programs.

"S. 1216 is a good bill that calls attention to an important life safety issue and promotes the use of quality, effective CO detection and notification devices," the letter stated.

The three organisations also commended the subcommittee leaders - Chairman Mark Pryor, D-Ark., and Ranking Member Roger Wicker, R-Miss. - for holding a hearing on CO poisoning on December 17. The letter is to be made a part of the hearing's official record.

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